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Answer these questions




a) Why is it called a 'packaged air conditioning unit'?

b) Why is it located on an outside wall?

c) What are the air filters made of?

d) When should the filters be cleaned?

e) What materials are used to make the evaporator?

f) What are the cooling coils designed to do?

Task 2.

Read the text.

Decide what title is more suitable for the text.

a.

b.

c.

d.

e.

3. Find in the text the words having the similar meaning to:

1. 4.
2. 5.
3. 6.

Answer the questions about the text.

5. These are answers to the questions about the text. Write the questions:

Are the following sentences true or false? If they are false correct them.

7. Translate into Russian the paragraph starting with the words: Concrete, to be durable, must be made of good materials to produce a smooth surface.

Unit 2.

Text 1.

Read the text.

 

The forms to be taken by community must be decided before they are constructed. But long-term "master plans", we have learned, must not be too detailed. Someone must plan where streets are to run, parks are to be laid out, and industrial facilities are to be furnished. Someone must plan new housing and new public buildings, parks, and playgrounds. Surely architects are necessary for these goals. And yet, community plans need the contribution of experts in many fields. Modern city planning has become so complex, so enmeshed in static, and so controlled by financial interests that too often com­munity plans appear that are lifeless and mechanical. In this field it is the architect's task to redress the balance, to realize that cities exist for people, that business and industry and science should serve the people and not enslave them.

During the last century hundreds of cities grew up throughout the world, and thousands of country towns expanded into great industrial or commercial centers. In the sense that all the buildings in Chicago or Los Angeles were constructed in recent times, they are modern com­munities. But in these new cities one searches in vain for any common principle of design that would distinguish them from earlier towns.

If, however, one examines the contemporary city more closely, one comes upon forms that had no counterpart in any earlier civiliza­tion. The country villa and the suburb are time-honored forms; but only with the development of rapid transportation, however, it became possible to disperse the population of a great center over an area at least ten times as great as the biggest cities of the past. The skyscraper has permitted the assembling of business offices and light industry in concentrated hives, served by vertical transportation; but the erection of such buildings on streets designed for four-story build­ings and horse drawn transportation has everywhere produced chaos.

Nowhere the new forces in urbanism have been organized so as to create both a functional and an aesthetic unity. One cannot derive an archetype for the modern city from any existing example. Neither can one create it merely by uncritically accepting all technological devices as essential ingredients. There is room, then, for an effort to define the modern community in ideal terms, on the basis of existing facts and tendencies. These facts and tendencies are not confined to the provinces of engineering and architecture; they issue from indus­try, from education, from medicine and psychology, and indeed from politics.

Decide what title is more suitable for the text.

1. The role of an architect in planning cities.

2. The community and architecture.

3. Modern city planning.

4. Impact of the industrial development on modern architecture.

5. Functional and an aesthetic unity.

 

3. Find in the text words having the similar meaning to:

1. difficult

2. to subsist

3. to compensate

4. to subjugate

5. to scatter

 

Answer the questions to the text.

1. Who must plan new housing and public buildings?

2. What forms are time-honoured?

3. Are there any forms in the modern cities that have counter­ parts in earlier civilizations?

4. What has the skyscraper has permitted?

5. What do modern tendencies issue from?




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